See A Chance

Happy Post-Turkey/Pre-Christmas Shenanigans. I hope the holiday season is treating you well so far. Frankly, I’m trying to stave off the insanity of Christmas shopping. I’m not one of those people who was done shopping a month ago, but I’m halfway through and that’s pretty spectacular in my opinion.

With the end of the year comes the time of year when I’m thinking of where I’m going to end up. Things are a bit chaotic as I’m in Plymouth far longer than I would normally remain in the east. That changes my normal plan to head to California the first of the year. I’m a snow bird, as we all know, and I head for warmth as soon as there’s even a hint of winter in the air. My plans are a little thrown off, which makes me wonder if this next year needs to be different.

My initial plan was to just stay where I am in New England for a few more weeks. I could finish and then take another trip to England only for 3 weeks instead of 4 days. Well that didn’t pan out. Now it’s trying to decide what to do next and I’m stressing through it.

Next year in May makes 5 years of straight traveling. That’s not a long time, but it feels long. I have these moments where I’m desperate for a break. Not just one or two or even three weeks off, but longer. Not from traveling, but from nursing itself. From staring at monitors, stressing about strips, worrying about making mistakes, or fretting about outcomes.

You can love something and need time away from it. We go and go until we’re forced to stop or we hate what we do so much we up and leave. We seem to take pride in burning ourself out. The funny thing is when the opportunity to take five comes, we don’t always take it. We waffle because money, family, obligations, obligations, obligations.

I may have the chance to take a break and I’m battling with whether I should take the chance. What if I don’t budget enough money or something happens or… or…

I realize that I have a lot of privilege in the decision I’m trying to make. I realize not everyone gets to be in a position where they can choose between taking time off and working to make ends meet. I’m very privileged.

So shouldn’t I seize the chance when its presented to me? I could try to find a short 8 week contract and hope I can get 3 weeks off, or I can budget my money and just take 11 weeks off. Get my big trip to England in and figure out the direction my career should take next. Which would you do if you could swing it?

Oh there’s a number of things I need to sort like finances and insurance. I’ve had a sleepless night or two lately as I’ve pondered the right thing to do. I already have some ideas on how to make it work, but it’ll require a bit of lean living for a bit. Not like I don’t need to live a little leaner anyway.

I feel like if I do what I normally would I’ll miss a chance to experience something awesome. Life has enough regrets that I’d hate to make this one.

Life sometimes gives us the opportunity to take big chances. Scary chances, exciting chances, daring chances. There’s a lot of what-ifs tied to stepping out, but there’s also a lot of freedom too. It requires thinking things through, but it also requires jumping and seeing where you land.

I guess I’ll do something that others may think is reckless. I’m a travel nurse though so a lot of what I do requires a certain degree of recklessness.

So, here’s to jumping and seeing where we land, eh?

Travel on, road warrior

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The Art of Charge

Breaker breaker. Radioing in from Rhode Island Comic Convention on this ridiculously chilly November day.

My second foray into nerdom. I rarely venture here as I’m not a nerd, but nerd adjacent/by proxy. I know enough to be dangerous, but not enough to follow things closely. It’s as important as my dose of cultural enlightening frankly

To the topic at hand: the importance of a good charge nurse.

Do not make the mistake of underestimating the role a good charge or team leader plays on the health and safety of a shift. You have a manager, but you need a leader to help the shift run smoothly. That person who takes the lead has to have important characteristics.

Experience: for a speciality like L&D, being in the field longer than a year or two makes you a better charge. Not because with less you can’t function as charge, but because you come to a point when you’ve done this long enough that you know instinctively what to plan for with a patient. I say this for travelers also, by the third year you feel less like you’re drowning and you know your speciality. The longer you’re at this the easier it is to navigate pitfalls.

Advising: you can direct the staff on how to handle trouble. You know how to plan and you can guide your staff members in planning or dealing with the patients.

Floor knowledge: the reason I won’t do charge as a traveler is because, while I know my specialty and can trust my gut with a patient, I don’t always know the floor as well. You have to know where everything is on the floor. Stuff for nursery, numbers to call, equipment placement.

Readiness: you have to be comfortable stepping in when you’re called upon. A combative patient, a confrontation with a staff member, a bad baby in the nursery, doing all the paperwork for a transfer. Backing a delivery or helping clean up if you can. You’ve got to be ready to do or know what’s happening.

Flexibility: I don’t expect you to take a labor or 4 couplets, but I want you to do it without complaint if you have to. Especially if I’m busting tail. Get your stuff done so if I need you or you’re called away, I’m not having to do your stuff too. Nothing bothers me more than saying you’ve got things to do and not actually doing them, getting busy, and then turfing your work to someone else (within reason!).

One important thing that makes or breaks charge for me is an awareness of your workers’ assignments. You give out assignments with the full awareness that if someone gets busy, you can reassign with ease. Don’t let your people drown because you’re not aware of what a bad assignment looks like. Is your person running around while everyone else sits? Either they’re one of those people who likes to look busy or they truly are busy. The former is best ignored after asking once if they’re okay and the latter requires reshuffling. A finger on the pulse of the floor is necessary for a good charge.

It sounds like I’m expecting a lot. I’m not sure it’s that so much as I’m looking for someone I can go to.  Even if we have the same level of experience, I want to be able to turn and look at you and know you’ve got my back. All those things listed fall under that banner for having my back as charge. It’s important to my level of comfort on a shift.

Having worked with charges in the past that have left me feeling like I have to make sure I have my own back, this is something I’ve been wanting to speak on.

Respect to all the good charge nurses and team leads out there. You’re the real MVPs.

Back to nerdom.

Travel on, Road Warriors

Team Player

Come one, come all. Settle in for your weekly bit of traveling nursing fluff to carry you into the next week. Frankly, and I’m surprised no one else realizes this, everything I post here are my general musings and things I think on or need to remember. I’m always trying to learn all I can to make navigating this travel life, life in general really, better. As you can tell, I manage it better some days and others I’m falling woefully short on the being a decent person bit.

In that same vein (and before I jump into my post), I try not to remark on the world at large because I’m all about sunshine and light here. Okay, I’m really about vacations and good food, same difference. It’s worth noting that being good to each other is an edict not taken very seriously. I find people are more interested in proving a point or being right as opposed to helping each other and building each other up. How far does being right get you in the end? Oh, you’ve succeeded in getting your point across, but have you lost the overall goal of drawing someone to your way of thinking? The writerly advice of showing and not telling (or beating someone to death with it) may offer a better approach.

But on to what you came here for…

My post itself is on the idea of being a team player, but maybe not quite in the way you’re imagining.

Recently, I was asked if I was free to come in to work. I said no at the time because I wasn’t. As many of you may realize, days off are a commodity to be hoarded with everything you have. Nurses are notorious for working their hours a week and then coming in because the floor has exploded and every pregnant woman in the area has decided to have their baby (or whatever your specialty equivalent is).

I was mentioning it to me mother, the saying no portion, and this is what she said.

“I guess you’re not a team player today.”

*record screech*

And then her head spun around on her shoulders and she exploded in a rage

Here’s why I don’t think the fair to use this phrase in conjunction with any nurse ever.

Nurses are carers and givers by nature. You can’t do this for any length of time unless your desire is to help people. Money won’t keep you because we don’t make enough for what we do.

We come in time and time again, at the expense of our wellbeing. If you work a night shift, you know that first day off isn’t really a day off. You’re a zombie. For instance yesterday, I had 2-3 hours of sleep post-work and woke up with zero desire to do anything. I don’t know how you people with kids manage. I literally laid in bed for hours after I opened my eyes debating what to have for dinner because cooking wasn’t an option. It’s hard to then think about coming in on your first full day off when you know it’s the only day you’re fully functioning before you have to go back to work again.

So we always come in when we’re asked, but it’s typically short on the floor. The nursing shortage is a known fact, and yet the expectation is that you’ve always worked short so if you’re a good unit you’ll pull together and find a way to make it work. It means working odd shifts, coming in on your day off for overtime, working unheard of hours of overtime to cover, and begging your coworkers to come in.

Why? Because you’re a team player. Be a team player

*rage*

When I’m at work, I give 100% of myself to my job. I’m here to help my coworkers, the providers, and care for my patients. Every travel assignment gets my all because I’m a nurse no matter where I am, and good care matters to me. But this be a team player bit has real consequences. People get burnt out, retire, or leave the bedside because they’re tired of always giving everything to the hospital without anything much to show for it. You’re not getting time off or away to revive yourself so you start to hate it.

Days off, distance, and balance matter. Don’t let anyone use the ‘be a team player’ gambit to shame you into giving up your days off. Its wrong and we need to stop it before we lose more good people. I will never be upset if you tell me you can’t come in extra. It’s your day off so enjoy it.

Self-preservation. Mental maintenance. Self-care. Call it what you’d like here, but honor it just the same.

So… there’s my rant for the week.

In other news, it’s NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month. I’m trying to write a bit as I haven’t participated in a long while. I may even post a story here next week to give you something other than travel nursing anecdotes. Also on the docket is another comic con, this time in Rhode Island. I’m only going one day, but because I’m me, I’ve added a Rhode Island food tour in the mix. Exciting times here, folks.

Stay safe, stay warm, stay dry, and stay kind.

Travel on, road warrior.

Even Good Things Change

Hello! Sorry for the month long radio silence. I went to England with plans to post and it didn’t happen, came back and got super sick for a week and a half following my trip, and have just recently stopped feeling like a whiny baby because of sinus trouble. All this to say, I didn’t get around to blogging like I planned. That’s life though, isn’t it? We sometimes make plans, but come to alternate outcomes.

The Lord determines our steps

I’m well in the midst of another contract here in Plymouth. 3 weeks in and 11 weeks left (I’m taking a week off in December). I’ve been here since May and I always have to remind myself that I’m not permanent.

I continue to travel for very specific reasons. I enjoy the change, the ability to see different places, and the general freedom traveling affords me. There’s risks involved in traveling, yes, but I find that the rewards out weigh any pitfalls.

One of the biggest things I’ve always struggled with in extending on assignments is getting comfortable and complacent. It’s easy to settle in and allow the current workplace drama (I’m not saying there’s drama here) to infiltrate your life. The circus and the monkeys start to become yours. If you thrive on change, it can make you irritable.

Another equally important thing is you notice when things start to change. When providers are grumpier than they used to be or coworkers are more upset about changes or cohesion is shaky. When you’re only someplace 3 months, you don’t care or notice otherwise. That’s the thing with staying put, you care.

Caring as a traveler isn’t a bad thing. People have this misconception that travelers are incapable of giving their all because they aren’t invested in the hospital. Untruth. I give my 100% everywhere I go because I’m a nurse no matter what. I want my patients to know they will get good care from me and I want my coworkers to know I’m a team player. What I don’t want to get involved in is politics. As long as the dramatic changes going on in the hospitals don’t affect my ability to work, the drama doesn’t matter to me. Staying removed is more difficult the longer you stay.

Lets not ignore the pluses to extending. Being in a work environment you like, knowing the routine, being able to navigate the area and the hospital with ease, and having the trust of your coworkers. I don’t want to let those things go without being said.

I can tell I’m ready to try something new though. The thrill of change is calling me. To keep me sharp, keep me energetic, and keep me loving what I do. Let’s be real, sometimes this isn’t fun. It wears you down and makes you question why you decided to be a nurse. I want to make sure I’m staving off that attitude as much as possible, and keeping moving is how I do it.

It’ll be time to investigate my next place to be. Will it be California again or somewhere totally new? Time will tell. Until then?

Travel on, road warrior

Conference, conferencing, conferenced

Welcome back, friend. Frankly, it’s always nice to see a smiling face around here. Why come if not to smile a bit, yes?

Anyway, I’m fresh off the glittery high that is the travel conference. If you were there, I’m sure you partied too hard, and if you weren’t, you didn’t party hard enough. Okay, imma be honest and admit I didn’t party at all. Listen, I was asleep by 8pm every night I was in Vegas. I’ve never been much of a partier, but 7-8 hours of solid sleep? I’m down for that e’ery day of the week.

Before I talk briefly about the conference itself, a word of warning, if someone asks you if you want a discounted show and free lunch at the hotel if you’ll just sit through a timeshare presentation… say no. You’re welcome.

On to the conference. This was actually my third travelers conference, but the 10th annual celebration. There’s so much to see, do, and experience when you attend. The things I appreciate the most about the conference, and the thing they continue to do every year, is bring topics forth that drive forward the improvement of traveling itself. Need to know about tax home, multi-state licensure, being a traveler outside of the US, or RV-ing? They have a seminar/talk available to you. I love that I can find what I need there, even if I’ve attended the topic (taxes) before. It always applies, always helps me, always makes me excited to be a traveler.

There were something like 1400 people in attendance. Some people were dreamers, in school or working and just thinking about what traveling would be like for them. They were able to mingle with other travelers and talk to them about traveling. Seasoned travelers were in attendance as well. People who have been traveling as long or longer than I have traveled. They could find more detailed tips to make traveling better for them or find a new recruiter. Companies turned out in droves, trying to hook new and old travelers. I’ve been with the same company for almost 5 years, which isn’t the norm, but it was interesting to meet recruiters and hear what they have to offer.

The mingling wasn’t my favorite part, but I know how the industry works and the necessary relationship travelers have with travel companies. This was evidenced by the way companies subsidized the cost of the conference for us. A wide range of companies, and hospitals even, were present. They’re goal is to recruit nurses who want to travel. Most travelers work with 2-3 recruiters to find an assignment so the conference is a great place to find a company that suits your needs.

It’s also a place to find travelers you’ve worked with in the past. It’s amazing to run into someone you suffered through with on a terrible contract. The good times come up and they also make traveling worth it.

I encourage you to attend next year even if you’re just thinking about traveling. It’s an excellent opportunity for you to get a taste for what traveling actually entails. Both the business and social aspects that compose the act of traveling.

1400 people is just a taste of the travelers that navigate this world. We do what no one else is willing to do, go into a new place and hit the ground running. We are traveled and we come to help.

If you missed the fun, check out my instagram for some great photos of the conference. You can also check the #travcon2017 in instagram for more fun.

So where to next? Well, I’m off for a short trip to England before I head back to Plymouth for the fall and *shudder* first part of winter. I’ll be visiting and staying with friends who live outside of London and are nice enough to let me stay with them. They’ll show me England and help me explore London AND I’ll keep my travel costs low. I’ll post photos, promise

All the traveling, all the time. That’s my business! So, until the next travel waves carries me away…

Travel on, road warrior

Happy employee, happy business?

So it looks like you’ll get two posts this week! Lucky you, right?

Conference offically starts in a couple of hours so I thought, with the start of a conference for people who travel for a living, why not discuss a topic I’ve beat to death  talked about on this blog many times.

Why people leave.

(On a side note: I’ve been trying to ease back into Facebook of late. I’d stepped away for a host of reasons, the least of which was the feeling of a non reality. Facebook tends to cultivate hard feelings and an unrealness. People say what they want on there with little regard to how that makes others feel. Political and social issues that are important to me become things those I have respected in the past feel they can say whatever they want, reposting ugly memes a person would otherwise think twice about posting. No one wants to be in that environment.)

Getting to it, LinkedIn emailed a post out this morning that I felt was incredibly timely. The Real Cost of Poor Leadership talked about many of the things I go on about fairly regularly, which is people leaving jobs they aren’t satisfied doing.  A few highlights that caught my eye:

 

I recently had a conversation at work… okay let’s just call it a rant… on why nurses job hop or leave the profession all together. It’s the old attrition and retention talk that plagues every field. We make decent money no matter where we live compared to the average American, we offer a service of caring that can be uplifting, we go into our profession with the aim of helping. So why do nurses keep leaving?

I reject the idea that this is generational or the result of the attitude that “if this doesn’t work, I’ll do something else.” Why? Because most nurses start with a desire to be all they can be.

The article mentions bad bosses or management. It’s no back up when you need it. It’s infighting when we should support each other (nurses eating their young/new). It’s that feeling of helplessness, hopelessness, and that general feeling that no one cares if you make it.

No praise for slaving away on a night when things are crazy and you barely made it. No considerations when decisions that directly effect productivity are made. More about money and bottom lines.

When the CEO making more than every person working on the floor combined, gets a bonus every year and the nurses risking their lives have gone two years plus without a raise, we’ve got a problem.

I travel because I can seek out better. Yes, every hospital has its problems, but there’s nothing that says I have to stay and endure crap. And some places are definitely crappier than others. I can move around and explore and save myself headache. Maybe I’ll find that perfect place, maybe I won’t, but I only have to suffer 3-6 months at a time instead of my entire career.

Been there. Done that. Life is too short to suffer a terrible manager (middle or upper), or a terrible doctor(s).

We deserve better as a profession and until we get there the travel industry will get bigger while the nursing shortage also increases.

The number of nurses here is insane and seems to be reveled only by the number of companies here trying to gather business. If I’ve learned anything, it’s that this is a business and we are a commodity. It’s difficult to navigate it well so a conference that discusses all the information you need to know is important.

Now if I could just do away with the necessary, but annoying schmoozing, I’d do even better.

Anyway, it’s time to get this conference underway. Maybe I’ll surprise us all by doing a post tomorrow!

Confernce on, road warrior? ☺️😊

Mitigating and Managing

Hello and welcome to the circus!

Seems wrong to call life a circus, but at times it feels like I have no idea what’s happening next (in my immediate sphere or outside of it) and how I’ll react to it. Maybe gasps. Maybe cheers of excitement. Or crying hysterically. Apt, don’t you think?

Well, in assignment news, a decision has finally been handed down. I won’t say too much until I’ve signed my contract because in this circus, the act can change in an instant. Just know I’m glad to finally have something done with 4 shifts left in this current assignment. It took a lot of reminding that things weren’t out of control just because I didn’t know what was happening next.

Now that I know I can move on to more exciting things. I’ve got a couple big trips lined up on my 3 weeks off. Both trips I’m very excited about for vastly different reasons, but excited nonetheless. One I’ll tell you about next week (travel nurse conference) and the other I’ll spring on you last minute as I’m trying to keep other parties calm on that front.

Thinking about my second upcoming trip makes me think on ways I mitigate and manage things in my life. We all have people, jobs, forces in our lives that we try keeping calm and juggling around.

I have a tendency to be majorly influenced by those who rotate in my orbit. It’s something I hate and appreciate. Appreciate because I have people whose opinions I value a lot. Hate because if they disagree with something I’m planning on doing, I can’t always shake off their strong opinion. Is it my decision not to do this or am I being influenced too heavily by someone? And how do I manage when said strong opinion becomes upset that I didn’t heed their advice? It’s been a life long struggle of mine to find the balance.

Mitigation and management come in handy not just in those moments in my life (it’s better to ask for forgivensss than permission by the way), but in work.

Negotiating pay packages. Advocating for patients. Dealing with bonehead doctors. Trying to figure out changes in insurance. Or why my HelloFresh box was randomly canceled. All things that require the ability to explain what you need, see the best solution to the problem, smooth ruffled feathers, and get the best for both parties if possible. While not screaming like a crazy lady

It’s not always possible to come to a solution that pleases everyone. Someone is going to walk away unhappy no matter how you try appease or conjole. But… I hope to have left the situation having handled it to the best of my ability

The words of the reckless pierce like swords, but the tongue of the wise brings healing 

from Proverbs 12:18 NIV

Frankly, my mouth gets the best of me. I’m trying to be levelheaded and calm because that’s what the situation requires, but the moment I’m affronted, cooler heads don’t always prevail. 🙈 Hey! Im trying to do better, be better, act better, but the tongue is a sword for a reason.

I need to heed the lessons I speak into this space. That means actually watching my mouth and trying to grant dignity to others. I just need to remember to not do those things at my personal expense. Sacrifice is important, but I tend to give more than I should to others. Balance.

Life is a circus. I’m trying to tight rope walk/juggle/clown car my way through it. Aren’t we all though?

As always, let’s all try to do better, shall we? I’ll lift you up a little and you extend the same arm to me until we manage to get there.

Until next time.

Travel on, road warrior.

Stop Me If You’ve Heard This Before

Well hello there, friend. Thanks for stopping in. Sorry I missed last week. I was back to work and sleeping was far more important than pretty much anything else. I picked up a weird 11p-11a shift that made me a zombie nurse and I’m just recovering (okay I’m not recovered at all).

4 weeks left in my current contract. I’m in the very spot I’m usually never in for reasons I’ve already mentioned. I don’t have my next contract lined up yet.

IMG_3066

Things have either fallen through, didn’t feel right, or weren’t happening. I’ve been doing a lot of mental pep-talking to convince myself I have nothing to worry about. Nothing. At. All. Something will pop up that will be exactly what I need and I’ll be happy. And even if it’s not perfect (because no assignment is perfect) I’ll have learned something about myself at the end of it all.

Which leads me to today’s post…

I’m sure I’ve discussed this topic before, but it never hurts to rehash it. Let’s do some definitions.

Bias: a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned

Prejudice: 1. an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason.
2. any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable

Stereotype:  a simplified and standardized conception or image invested with special meaning and held in common by members of a group

I don’t feel like I need to say anything more about any of those definitions apart from saying that everyone has preconceived notions. As humans, we classify things in order to have them make sense in our minds. It’s what we do, it’s not necessarily a bad thing… until it flips over into a behavior that causes us to treat someone else in a way that harms/disadvantages/holds them back.

The media, TV shows, and general news can reinforce them until they become rote in our minds. Bias hurts, prejudice hurts. Stereotypes I can work with. We can bust people out of boxes just by getting to know them. They become a person instead of an it because we’ve attached a face to their profession/addiction/sin/behavior. Then we find that, no, not all (insert people group) are like this just because I read it in a book. Unless of course you’re doing something truly awful then perhaps you are the thing you’ve been classified as by others. 🤔

As a traveler, I run into and try to overcome other people’s stereotypes concerning travel nurses. What’s a travel nurse? A regular nurse who travels. Haven’t ever worked with a good travel nurse? Wait until you work with me because I try my hardest to be a good nurse. Think travel nurses don’t care about the hospital or the job they’re at? Not true of every traveler. We’re there to work and be team players and I’ll work to show you that every time I walk in the door.

I’ve worked places that were hostile to travelers, where they worked to get them fired or ran them off. I’ve experienced places indifferent to travelers, where they didn’t care if you came to work or not as you’re just a body anyway. I’ve also worked at places that were grateful to each traveler who showed up. Everyone has an opinion about travelers; the work we do, the reason we do it, the money we make doing it, and I’ve seen the bias more often than not in the way they assign patients or treat the traveler in general.

All this to say, be teachable. Everyone is not the cookie cutter person you think them to be. It’s okay to have formed opinions and impressions, but give people the chance to blow your mind. You may meet a great travel nurse or friend that way. Admitting you have bias doesn’t make you a bad person, holding on to that bias and treating someone shabby does in my mind.

We can all do better, can’t we? Let’s start now.

Travel on, road warrior

The Good, The Bad, And The… Meh?

Another assignment completed. That means it’s time to hit the road and head off to my next assignment. Always to the next one with me.

I travel because being anywhere permanently makes even thinking about staying somewhere makes me break out in hives. While I’ve always known this, traveling has made it more obvious that there is no ‘awesome place to work’. Every place has its issues whether they are frank or hidden. The nature of the hospital setting lends itself to problems that aren’t easily solved. It could be staffing issues, management issues, upper management issues, or just interpersonal issues. Something always make it less than ideal.

Not every assignment is going to be amazing because every place has their issues. Not everyone is going to love me or what I bring to the table when I come there to help them. In their eyes, I’m simply another body where they’ve been incredibly short and as long as I’m capable enough they don’t need anything else from me.

Did I love this previous assignment? I started with mixed feelings and ended the same ways. This is one place that I didn’t have a party at the end. Not that a party when a traveler leaves is indicative of anything, but it’s obvious that you’re being there and leaving make a difference when they bother to have something for you. I know I was the only one of my group of incoming travelers that didn’t renew. That’s not necessarily reflective of the place as I always head back east, but I also didn’t want to stay where I felt so indifferent either.

It’s a reminder that you can still be the best you as a traveler even if no one else notices.

I’m rapidly coming up on four years of this travel nurse thing and I’m continuing to learn things. Mostly about myself and what I will tolerate, but also about my skills and abilities. I struggled at times this past few months with feeling unrecognized. As is typical of my personality, I realize I need to at least know someone appreciates me being around to help. That isn’t always possible so I need to remember who I am and what I know. Those things doesn’t change when I go somewhere that isn’t so excited to have travelers outside of filling vacated spots.

So every place, no matter how difficult, has a lesson or a learning point. Whether it’s something that boosts your skill set or something that increases your emotional awareness, every place will teach.

So I’ll keep on to the next thing as usual. Travelers gotta travel and I’m a traveler to the core.

Travel on, road warrior.